We Like — Kinky Tastes

Last year saw the designers osko + deichmann contributing their highly individual take on the Modernist heritage to the 90th year celebrations of the Bauhaus. Previously associated with much more organic, fluid lines in their designs for furniture, the duo headed in the opposite direction, focusing on the aesthetics of tubular steel. In particular, they were fascinated by the way in which the curving of tubular steel – strongly connected with designers like Breuer- had become an almost subconscious normative aesthetic for the material; how to read it as ‘beautiful’.

osko + deichmann 'Kink' chair

osko + deichmann 'Kink' chair

They subsequently produced the first chair in the ‘Kink’ series. Intentionally ‘damaging’ the tubular steel, their reworking of a Bauhaus classic immediately reads as mangled or broken and yet, the harsh folds worked into their design are not only intentional, but effectively demand a revision of the material since its durability and functionality are not affected that negatively.

Continuing their conceptual horseplay with design’s heritage, they have subsequently expanded their ‘Kink’ series to include a range of other furniture that play clever games with the visually jarring impact of squashed metal. Their exhibition of these works continues at Helmrinderknecht Contemporary Design in Berlin until 22 May.

osko + deichmann 'Kink' table

osko + deichmann 'Kink' table