Issue 3 —



One thing we all have in common is ability to feel fear.Horror is a uniform human facet.This applies whether you are a successful pop star guided by the most influential man in commercial music , like cover star Leona Lewis,or a young star going solo,armed with the hefty bedrock of streaming success he achieved with his brothers in a massive boy band like our second  cover star Joe Jonas.

    Issue 3 –
    February 2012 116 Pages 0 Minutes of audio 0 Minutes of video
    In This Issue –
    Monster Reebok's Slot Merino Diesel Sam Robinson Joe Jonas Leona Lewis Professor Green Jonathan Saunders
    Editor In Chief –
    Becky Davies
    Creative Director –
    Way Perry
    Art Director –
    Felix Neill
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Our Take —



Rollacoaster is a brand spanking new title from the publishers responsible for Wonderland and Man About Town. Under the editorial guidance of Becky Davies, Rollacoaster has a more fun, lighthearted and immediately British identity compared with its older relatives.

It shares the same international outlook and luxe feel as Wonderland, but, quite rightly, Rollacoaster is doing different things and is aimed at a different readership. That is, if the premiere issue is anything to judge by, a wider audience of teenagers and twenty-somethings who need to balance their appetite for luxury and must-have expensive goodies with more attainable items for a more realistic pocket.

Rollacoaster is strongly grounded in UK culture found in fashion, music and lifestyle spread across pages with a simple, stark and effective art direction that is sometimes reminiscent of UK magazines of the 80’s and early 90’s. There is a welcome sense of traditional English –and traditionally cynical- journalistic writing in Rollacoaster - hurrah for the return of the columnist! Clever without labouring the point; breezy without being brain-dead, Rollacoaster is an interesting arrival on the UK publishing scene. Lessons learned in not patronising one’s audience, from the once sacrosanct institution of the English music magazine, have been reinvented and applied for a generation for whom looking cool also means looking good. Once hanging around a student union bar with greasy hair, a pint of snakebite and big opinions was enough for British youth. Smartly, the Rollacoaster team is speaking to a generation with updated expectations.
 

Categories –
Culture Design Fashion

Website –
www.rollacoaster.tv