We Want to Believe —



The birth of Fuego, issue one, gets off to an unabashedly self-referential start. For example, one of the projects in this, the I Want To Believe issue, takes the fact that one of the maker’s fathers worked on an experimental 8mm movie about UFO’s in the 1970’s as a prompt to make their own photos of faked UFO’s. This kind of re-enactment – and yes, it’s not outside of the realms of certain contemporary art practices- produces a series of photos that at once resonate on numerous levels. Perhaps the most lucid of these is just how familiar fake UFO photos now are in the collective consciousness. Perhaps more poetically, they capture the tension that many of us feel between knowing that they are fakes – as taught to us by hundreds of television programmes- and wanting to believe in some other form of life out there. Referencing the cult 1990’s X-Files series’ catchphrase, this tension between belief and empirical knowledge seems to be the main theme present in the issue. Carefully realised with an aesthetic that entirely denies the Photoshop and After Effects filters that now permeate everything from mainstream Sci-Fi films to sneaker adverts, this is a precise meditation on the topic. 

    We Want to Believe –
    June 2010 39 Pages 0 Minutes of audio 0 Minutes of video
    In This Issue –
    How to fake UFO photography All the truth about Bob Lazar Galactic architecture Ubiquitous fearsome orifice
    Directors –
    Coke Bartrina,Elena Gallen
    Fuego - We Want to Believe  Fuego - We Want to Believe  Fuego - We Want to Believe  Fuego - We Want to Believe  Fuego - We Want to Believe  We Want to Believe  Fuego - We Want to Believe
 

Our Take —



Fuego Fanzine is a new limited edition title aimed at the collector/fan market of interesting underground art books or good art direction. Theoretically biannual (I guess we need to wait for issue 2 to be certain), it’s the work of Barcelona-based editorial duo Coke Bartrina and Elena Gallen. This is quite clearly an experimental and somewhat self-referential project; a labour of love and personal aside to the main thrust of their more commercial work. As such, it would be unreasonable to judge it as something it is not trying to be. As a piece of experimental design and publishing it more than holds its own and, with a very small edition, is probably going to sell out pretty easily. This means that if you’re not going to be quick enough to get your hands on one of those editions – who knows, these kids could be tomorrow’s big news- then it’s probably a good idea to get an insight into whether you want to be at the front of the line for the next issue by getting it as a digital product.

Categories –
Art Creative Photography

Website –
Fuegofanzine.com